06. RPA Implementation Plan: Step by Step


Implementing RPA within an organization requires a carefully crafted plan to ensure successful integration. Let’s break down the process into steps for a seamless RPA implementation. Step 1: Initial Assessment The first crucial step is to conduct a thorough assessment of processes within your organization. Identify tasks that are repetitive, rule-based, and high in volume…

Implementing RPA within an organization requires a carefully crafted plan to ensure successful integration. Let’s break down the process into steps for a seamless RPA implementation.

Step 1: Initial Assessment

The first crucial step is to conduct a thorough assessment of processes within your organization. Identify tasks that are repetitive, rule-based, and high in volume – ideal candidates for RPA. Evaluate the existing IT infrastructure, assess potential benefits, and define clear goals for automation. Consider the sectors where RPA would initiate automation and establish its foundation.

Step 2: Business Plan Development

Create a compelling business plan that details expected return on investment (ROI), benefits, and alignment with strategic business goals. Quantify the impact of RPA on efficiency, cost savings, and error reduction. Present this plan to key stakeholders to secure support and commitment, obtaining the green light for the next steps.

Step 3: Selection of the Right RPA Tools

Choose RPA tools that align with the requirements and scalability of your organization. Consider factors such as user-friendliness, integration capability, and vendor support. Evaluate multiple solutions to find the best fit for your specific needs.

Step 4: Team Formation

If your company doesn’t have a team, assemble a team ready to execute tasks and continue with project expansion. Initially, the team doesn’t have to be large, but it’s essential to have at least one person familiar with the entire RPA implementation process, from initial presentation through documentation and development to deployment and maintenance. More will be written about the ideal structure and expectations for each position in future blogs. At least one person with experience in delivering and maintaining RPA solutions, along with additional individuals with intermediate and junior levels of knowledge, can aid in faster delivery.

Step 5: Pilot Projects

Before proceeding with full implementation, conduct pilot projects to confirm the chosen RPA solution’s viability. Select a few processes that align with the initial assessment, implement automation, and evaluate the results. Pilot projects provide valuable insights, allowing you to fine-tune the approach and gain insights into unexpected challenges.

Step 6: Development and Testing of Automated Workflows

Once RPA tools are selected and pilot projects show positive results, begin developing automated workflows. Collaborate closely with the team whose processes are being automated to ensure that selected processes are accurately replicated in the digital environment. Thorough testing is necessary to identify and address any disruptions or inefficiencies. In my experience, being in a situation where my slightly unconventional approach to projects that exceeded expected time frames delivered within the agreed-upon deadline by practicing the “early deployment” method, as outlined in my methodology focused exclusively on RPA (Mindful RPA Methodology).

Step 7: Training and Change Management

Provide comprehensive training for employees working with RPA technologies. Address any uncertainties and emphasize the collaborative nature of RPA. Implement change management strategies to ease the transition and gain user acceptance. Importantly, if a problem arises and a robot starts making errors, it’s crucial to address it promptly so that the team has insight and can fix the issue in a timely manner. If errors coincide with other changes in the system, they can easily be connected, and the cause can be rectified.

Step 8: Expansion of Pilot Projects

After successful pilot projects and thorough testing, proceed with full implementation. Implement RPA in identified processes, closely monitoring performance metrics and user feedback. Observe the impact on efficiency, accuracy, and overall productivity. Continue with the “Pilot Project” approach when it comes to other sectors of the organization. Although the RPA team has laid the foundation and started delivering projects as planned, it’s essential to consider that every new user who hasn’t had prior exposure to RPA should be treated as if they are a Pilot Project. Teams often become complacent because they have a flowing structure, so when new users arrive, they initiate communication with them as if they are already aware of what RPA is and how it functions, leading to communication gaps and potential interruptions in RPA adoption, as the user hasn’t gone through the technology introduction.

Step 9: Continuous Improvement

RPA implementation is not a one-time task but a continuous process. Establish mechanisms for continuous improvement, gather feedback, and optimize automated workflows. Regularly assess the performance and scalability of RPA, making adjustments as needed. While one robot performs a specific task within the scheduled time and everything aligns with the initial steps, always keep in mind the improvement of that process, speeding up or enhancing stability, as new technologies make process execution easier. When the team becomes well-coordinated and the structure already exists, it’s easier to make changes or merge robots if there are two users with similar processes.

Step 10: Monitoring, Measurement, and Optimization

Implement robust tools for monitoring the performance of automated processes. Establish key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure the success of RPA implementation. Regularly review these metrics and optimize automated workflows for better results. Another reason for continuous monitoring is the usability of robots and licenses. It’s not uncommon for a process to change, and users stop feeding information to the robot because the robot itself is no longer needed. The robot starts every day at the scheduled time, executes initial steps, and successfully completes automation due to a lack of input information. An RPA team that doesn’t track metrics sees that the robot performs the task every day without errors, not realizing that the robot is actually doing nothing. In such situations, the robot is either turned off or redirected to do something else.

Conclusion: Transformed Workflow

RPA is not just a technological upgrade; it is a strategic shift that can revolutionize the way your company operates. By carefully navigating through each stage of the implementation plan, you can unlock the full potential of RPA and witness a transformed workflow contributing to increased efficiency and overall success.


Djuro Ivankovic Avatar